Not surprisingly, folks with a disability, their families, friends and supporters are determined to make the world a better place for all people with disability. We also understand that in doing so we are making the world a better place for everyone.

We seek impact. Not short term impact. But impact that lasts and sustains itself over time. Impact that changes people’s attitudes and society’s structures.

Not surprisingly, in order to achieve impact many of us have well-developed advocacy muscles. But advocacy is a means to an end. We become advocates because our innovations aren’t being recognized and implemented. In other words, before advocacy comes innovation.

Perhaps surprisingly, ingenuity is the core competency of people with disabilities and their families. We are continuously inventing and creating our way out of adversity.  We have “impact-ability.”

And if that true, it follows that nurturing our innovation muscles is as important as exercising our advocacy muscles.


“You don’t have to be disabled to be innovative, but it sure helps.”

Norman Kunc, innovator extraordinaire

Musical selection is by award winning jazz singer Joe Coughlin. Listen to “Waltz for Debby” here. Purchase here.

(Victoria BC residents chcek out Joe’s December 12th gig. He is devoting an evening to Frank Sinatra songs to honour that crooner’s 100th birthday.)


Ten Innovations That Have Shaped the World of Disability

Joe Coughlin – Slow and Slower

Encyclopedia House

The restaurant where I work is right around the corner from the Bataclan…

My Challenge with Introducing Social Innovation to Indigenous Communities

The Vitality of Despair

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